Tag Archive | workplace

7 Tips On Creating Workplace Motivation

makethings

 

Workplace motivation is one of those interesting things. We think it should just drop out of the sky like magic but it never really does. We also don’t really think about how to create motivation for ourselves. However, we really can create it with the right tools.  Let’s get on the same page about what motivation is. Motivation is what causes you to take action. Clearly, you’re at work so you do have some motivation because your action is going to work and performing your job. What we are talking about is feeling engaged and inspired about the actions you do take. Let’s look at some of the tools you can use to get fully engaged and motivated in the workplace:

1. Change

There’s nothing like changing things to really get the juices going. You don’t want to change things just for the sake of changing; however, you want to change things that don’t work well. With that, you must have a vision of what the right outcome would be and then you apply your steps to create the action for change.

2. Goals

Many times, the lack of motivation is due to a lack of direction or goals. Sit down and figure out what would really get you up in the morning and make that your goal. Having a goal isn’t enough, though. It has to be a goal that you yearn for or have some emotions about. Once established, put together a plan for how you will achieve your goals. If you really are going to shoot for something worth having, keep in mind SMART for goals = Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Resonate, and Time.

3. Be Accountable

The vast majority of us want to do things but we’re really lazy about doing them. It’s often easier to diet or workout with someone because we have a person that is looking for us to perform. Find someone to hold you accountable to yourself and be willing to trade off the favor.

4. Clean Up Your Own Internal Litter

We all have baggage, but sometimes we have so much of it cluttering up our life that it bogs us down and we fail to see what’s possible.

5. Surround Yourself With The Right People

Yes, your mother was right… it is important to hang out with the right people. In this case, hang out with people who are inspired and motivated as it will be contagious.

6. Research The Issue

Find out from others what motivates them. In the process, you may hear something that would really be great for you. Don’t be afraid to copy what works.

7. Cop An Attitude

Motivation creates more motivation. Look for it and it will be there. We often get hung up about our ability to control things in the workplace. The one thing we can control is our attitude and approach to various workplace challenges. These tools for workplace motivation are simple to do which means there is nothing but you holding you up from trying them.

By Dorothy Tannahill-Moran Work it Daily

 

4 Ways To Find Your Motivation At Work

motivation

The other day I had a client come to me with an all-too familiar dilemma: she had lost motivation at work, and in turn her happiness. Studies show employee motivation and happiness are inherently linked, so it was no surprise this client, Amanda, was so affected by her lack of motivation.

The less happy you are at work, the less productive, and your motivation can plummet even further. It’s a terrible cycle that so many people find themselves stuck in.

Lack of motivation at work is a problem for the economy, as well. One study revealed that only 13% of the workforce is actively engaged in their job. That’s one out of eight employees. It’s not the type of data employers want to see, and not good for employee morale, either. Happy employees are good employees, and the effects of going to a job every day that you dislike are crushing.

So how can you regain your motivation, your happiness, and your overall satisfaction? Try these four tips.

1. Ask for feedback.

Sometimes, you can get so focused on your work you can lose sight of the little ways you can improve, or even where you’re adding value. Not knowing how you can do better or what you’re contributing can absolutely lead to a lack of motivation.

One way to remedy this is ask your coworkers or leaders for feedback. There’s always room to learn and grow in any professional role, and there’s no one better to help you target specific areas of growth than the people you interact with daily, and who know your work.

2. Celebrate others.

If you’re feeling uninspired and stuck, a great way to get yourself out of your rut is to take the focus off yourself and start celebrating others around you. This kind of positive thinking leads to stronger friendships and even improved satisfaction and income.

In fact, studies show employees who have more positive interactions with their coworkers are more productive and engaged with their work. So it’s worth it to take a bit of time to congratulate people on a promotion or completed project, or even just compliment them on a job well done.

3. Start saying ‘no.’

It can be so tempting to say yes to everything, especially if you’re feeling unmotivated. After all, wouldn’t it make sense that the more projects you take on or the more events you attend, the more likely you are to find your motivation again?

Unfortunately, saying yes to everything can actually burn you out. Fast. Science shows that saying no can improve productivity and mental health.

If you feel torn between wanting to make someone else happy and wanting to make yourself happy, remember: Saying no to whatever they are asking of you is just another way of saying yes to what you truly want to commit yourself to.

4. Take a break!

It can be tempting to want to work through the rut, but this might not be the best course of action. Did you know that Americans leave an average of 3.2 vacation days unused. This habit of not taking a vacation has to stop! Taking that break from work can leave you refreshed and rejuvenated.

In fact, a study by Harvard College showed that 94% of workers who took a vacation stated that they had as much—if not more—energy after coming back from a good trip. 55% confirmed that they returned to work with higher levels of energy than before the trip.

We all fall into motivation slumps in our careers at some point or another.

I’ve been there. I get it.

But knowing how to respond to that lack of motivation is the difference between breaking out of your rut or staying lost. Follow these tips and you might just find your motivation flooding back!

By Ashley Stahl for Forber.com

What People Want From Work: Motivation

The-Impact-of-Motivation-Ability-Role-Perception-on-Employee

 

Every individual person has different motivations for working at a job. The reasons for working are as individual as the person. But, all people work because the workplace provides something that you need from work. The something that you obtain from your work impacts your morale, your motivation, and the quality of your life.

Here are thoughts about employee motivation, what people want from work, and how you can help employees attain what they need for their work motivation.

Work is About the Money

Some people work for their love of the work; others work for personal and professional fulfillment. Other people like to accomplish goals and feel as if they are contributing to something larger than themselves, something important, an overarching vision for what they can create. Some people have personal missionsthey accomplish through meaningful work.

Others truly love what they do or the clients they serve. Some like the camaraderie and interaction with customers and coworkers. Other people like to fill their time with activity. Some workers like change, challenge, and diverse problems to solve. As you can see, employee motivation is individual and diverse.

Whatever your personal reasons for working, the bottom line, however, is that almost everyone works for money. Whatever you call it: compensationsalarybonusesbenefits or remuneration, money pays the bills. Money provides housing, gives children clothing and food, sends teens to college, and allows leisure activities, and eventually, retirement. Unless you are independently wealthy, you need to work to collect a paycheck.

To underplay the importance of money and benefits as motivation for people who work is a mistake. It may not be their most significant motivator or even the motivational factor they’d first mention in a conversation but earning a living is a factor in any discussion about employee motivation.

Fair benefits and pay are the cornerstones of a successful company that recruits and retains committed workers. If you provide a living wage for your employees, you can then work on additional motivation issues. Without the fair, living wage, however, you risk losing your best people to a better-paying employer.

In fact, research from Watson Wyatt Worldwide in “The Human Capital Edge: 21 People Management Practices Your Company Must Implement (or Avoid) to Maximize Shareholder Value,” recommends, that to attract the best employees, you need to pay more than your average-paying counterparts in the marketplace. Money provides basic motivation.

Got Money? What’s Next for Motivation?

Surveys and studies dating back to the early 1980s demonstrate that people want more from work than money. An early study of thousands of workers and managers by the American Psychological Association clearly demonstrated this.

Managers predicted that the most important motivational aspect of work for people they employed would be money. Instead, it turned out that personal time and attention from the manager or supervisor was cited by workers as the most rewarding and motivational for them at work.

In a “Workforce” article, “The Ten Ironies of Motivation,” reward and recognition guru, Bob Nelson, says, “More than anything else, employees want to be valued for a job well done by those they hold in high esteem.” He adds that people want to be treated as if they are adult human beings who think, makes decisions, tries to do the right thing, and don’t need a caretaker watching over their shoulders.

While what people want from work is situational, depending on the person, his needs and the rewards that are meaningful to him, giving people what they want from work is really quite straightforward. The basics are:

  • Control of their work inspires motivation: including such components as the ability to have an impact on decisions; setting clear and measurable goals; clear responsibility for a complete, or at least defined, task; job enrichment; tasks performed in the work itself; and recognition for achievement.
  • To belong to the in-crowd creates motivation: including items such as receiving timely information and communication; understanding management’s formulas for decision making; team and meeting participation opportunities; and visual documentation and posting of work progress and accomplishments.
  • The opportunity for growth and development is motivational: and includes education and training; career paths; team participation; succession planning; cross-training; and field trips to successful workplaces.
  • Leadership is key in motivation. People want clear expectations that provide a picture of the outcomes desired with goal setting and feedback and an appropriate structure or framework.

Recognition for Performance Creates Motivation

In “The Human Capital Edge,” authors Bruce Pfau and Ira Kay say that people want recognition for their individual performance with pay tied to their performance.

Employees want people who don’t perform fired; in fact, failure to discipline and fire non-performers is one of the most demotivating actions an organization can take—or fail to take. It ranks on the top of the list next to paying poor performers the same wage as non-performers in deflating motivation.

Additionally, the authors found that a disconnect continues to exist between what employers think people want at work and what people say they want for motivation.

People want employers to pay them above market rates. They seek flexible work schedules. They want stock options, a chance to learn, and the increased sharing of the rationale behind management decisions and direction.

What You Can Do for Motivation and Positive Morale

You have much information about what people want from work. Key to creating a work environment that fosters motivation are the wants and needs of the individual employees. The most significant recommendation for your takeaway is that you need to start asking your employees what they want from work and whether they are getting it.

With this information in hand, you’ll be surprised at how many simple and inexpensive opportunities you have to create a motivational, desirable work environment. Pay attention to what is important to the people you employ for high motivation and positive morale. When you foster these for people, you’ll achieve awesome business success.

 

Source: BY SUSAN M. HEATHFIELD for The Balance Careers

Pursuit of a healthy work/life balance

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For a lot of people, the pursuit of a healthy work/life balance seems like an impossible goal.

With so many of us torn between juggling heavy workloads, managing relationships and family responsibilities, and squeezing in outside interests, it’s no surprise that more than one in four Americans describe themselves as “super stressed.” And that’s not balanced—or healthy.

In our rush to “get it all done” at the office and at home, it’s easy to forget that as our stress levels spike, our productivity plummets. Stress can zap our concentration, make us irritable or depressed, and harm our personal and professional relationships.

Over time, stress also weakens our immune systems, and makes us susceptible to a variety of ailments from colds to backaches to heart disease. The newest research shows that chronic stress can actually double our risk of having a heart attack. That statistic alone is enough to raise your blood pressure!

While we all need a certain amount of stress to spur us on and help us perform at our best, the key to managing stress lies in that one magic word: balance. Not only is achieving a healthy work/life balance an attainable goal but workers and businesses alike see the rewards. When workers are balanced and happy, they are more productive, take fewer sick days, and are more likely to stay in their jobs.

Here are a few practical steps we can all take to loosen the grip that stress has on us and win back the balance in our lives. Read on and reap the benefits.

At Work

  • Set manageable goals each day. Being able to meet priorities helps us feel a sense of accomplishment and control. The latest research shows that the more control we have over our work, the less stressed we get. So be realistic about workloads and deadlines. Make a “to do” list, and take care of important tasks first and eliminate unessential ones. Ask for help when necessary.
  • Be efficient with your time at work.When we procrastinate, the task often grows in our minds until it seems insurmountable. So when you face a big project at work or home, start by dividing it into smaller tasks. Complete the first one before moving on to the next. Give yourself small rewards upon each completion, whether it’s a five minute break or a walk to the coffee shop. If you feel overwhelmed by routines that seem unnecessary, tell your boss. The less time you spend doing busy work or procrastinating, the more time you can spend productively, or with friends or family.
  • Ask for flexibility. Flex time and telecommuting are quickly becoming established as necessities in today’s business world, and many companies are drafting work/life policies. If you ask, they might allow you to work flexible hours or from home a day a week. Research shows that employees who work flexible schedules are more productive and loyal to their employers.
  • Take five. Taking a break at work isn’t only acceptable, it’s often encouraged by many employers. Small breaks at work—or on any project—will help clear your head, and improve your ability to deal with stress and make good decisions when you jump back into the grind.
  • Tune in. Listen to your favorite music at work to foster concentration, reduce stress and anxiety, and stimulate creativity. Studies dating back more than 30 years show the benefits of music in everyday life, including lowered blood pressure. Be sure to wear headphones on the job, and then pump up the volume—and your productivity.
  • Communicate effectively. Be honest with colleagues or your boss when you feel you’re in a bind. Chances are, you’re not alone. But don’t just complain—suggest practical alternatives. Looking at a situation from someone else’s viewpoint can also reduce your stress. In a tense situation, either rethink your strategy or stand your ground, calmly and rationally. Make allowances for other opinions, and compromise. Retreat before you lose control, and allow time for all involved to cool off. You’ll be better equipped to handle the problem constructively later.
  • Give yourself a break. No one’s perfect! Allow yourself to be human and just do the best you can.

​At Home

  • Unplug. The same technology that makes it so easy for workers to do their jobs flexibly can also burn us out if we use them 24/7. By all means, make yourself available—especially if you’ve earned the right to “flex” your hours—but recognize the need for personal time, too.
  • Divide and conquer. Make sure responsibilities at home are evenly distributed and clearly outlined—you’ll avoid confusion and problems later.
  • Don’t over commi Do you feel stressed when you just glance at your calendar? If you’re overscheduled with activities, learn to say,” no.” Shed the superman/superwoman urge!
  • Get support. Chatting with friends and family can be important to your success at home—or at work—and can even improve your health. People with stronger support systems have more aggressive immune responses to illnesses than those who lack such support.
  • Take advantage of your company’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Many organizations offer resources through an EAP, which can save you precious time by providing guidance on issues like where to find a daycare center and caretaking for an elderly parent, as well as referrals to mental health and other services.
  • Stay active. Aside from its well-known physical benefits, regular exercise reduces stress, depression and anxiety, and enables people to better cope with adversity, according to researchers. It’ll also boost your immune system and keep you out of the doctor’s office. Make time in your schedule for the gym or to take a walk during lunch—and have some fun!
  • Treat your body right. Being in good shape physically increases your tolerance to stress and reduces sick days. Eat right, exercise and get adequate rest. Don’t rely on drugs, alcohol or cigarettes to cope with stress; they’ll only lead to more problems.
  • Get help if you need it. Don’t let stress stand in the way of your health and happiness. If you are persistently overwhelmed, it may be time to seek help from a mental health professional. Asking for help is not a sign of weakness—taking care of yourself is a sign of strength.

http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/work-life-balance

Workplace Outfit Tips

 

outfit ideas

 

  1. Get Inspired

Seasonal change is the perfect time to hit the pause button and get inspired!  Make the time to flip through magazines, head downtown, surf the web… get inspired by the natural style reset that presents itself with the change of seasons.

  1. Pick Your Path

Get clear on the season’s style cue’s that emotionally resonate with you. Not all trends are for all people – and that’s a good thing!

  1. Claim Your Color Crushes

Color is one of the easiest ways to update one’s wardrobe and yet it’s so easy to get stuck in a rut.  Two rules of thumb:  1. Know your neutral. Rooting your wardrobe in the neutral that best suits you will help to optimize versatility.  Black not for you? Maybe you are more of a grey, brown or navy person. Whatever it is – claim it.  2.  Same goes for seasonal color. Commit to a tight palette of newness. Just one or two new colors go a long way.

  1. Make Room For the New

Before setting out to shop, take stock of what you have.  Donate, sell or give away what you’ve not worn in the last year.  A pared down closet will simplify getting dressed each morning and who wouldn’t want that?!

  1. Shop Strategically

After taking inventory of your existing wardrobe, identify the gaps and shop with clear intent. This approach will keep you from over shopping and also ensure that you can style a lot of different looks out of a curated collection of pieces.

  1. Double Down

There are some things that are worth investing in, if you are able.  Shoes, handbags and outerwear are top of the list. Why? Because they complete the look. Pair an awesome pair of shoes with less expensive apparel and the look is instantly elevated. Same goes for handbag or outerwear.

  1. Embrace Your Go-To’s

It’s tempting to feel like you need to dress a certain way when you’re under pressure for a big meeting. Comfort breeds confidence. Don’t ditch your go-to (fill in the blank) if you’ve got a big presentation coming up. Wearing what you feel comfortable in will positively impact your ability to show up as your best self.

  1. Ignore the Rules

As the workplace evolves and dress codes relax, it’s more fun than ever to push your workplace style. Pair denim with denim, wear black with navy, choose white after Labor Day (gasp!) or opt for a sequined top during the day. Above all, fashion is a creative outlet to express yourself.  Have fun with it!

  1. Travel with Purpose

When traveling for work or pleasure, focus on a narrow color palette and build outfits around that. You’ll be able to do more with less and might even save you from checking a bag!

  1. The Toolkit is Key

Invest in a hand-steamer over an iron.  It’s compact, quick and so much easier than the alternative!  Keep it in your bathroom for last minute touch ups. Other tools to keep handy at your desk or in your bag include a lint brush (or masking tape in a pinch) and polishing cloths for shoes and jewelry.

 

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/sboyd/2016/09/24/how-to-dress-for-success/#1c9fb1c341f4

Top 10 Ways to Accentuate the Positive in the Workplace

Smile. The economy is making a comeback!

Understandably, this statement may be a challenge to digest in light of reports from The Wall Street Journal that nearly one in three unemployed people have been out of work for more than a year, and headlines about massive job cuts from major corporations.

None-the-less, statistics from the U.S. Labor Department show that unemployment rates have dropped to 15.8% from 15.9% in recent months, and new national and state-wide Job Plans are on the horizon. Sure, the economy is improving slowly at best; however, do you remember the story of the Tortoise & The Hare? Slow and steady WINS THE RACE!

Still, the reality of being unemployed, under-employed, over-worked, underpaid, or unappreciated at work can certainly be wearing on us in more ways than one. According to The YOU Docs, Doctor Oz and Doctor Roizen, “the shaky economy’s ratcheting up workday stress for 70 percent of us.” These Docs go on to stress how this infects our home life, is a health threat, and just bad for business.

Well. Here’s the latest headline, hot off the presses:

You Can Improve Your Mood & Stay Positive at Work!

Just by reading this article, you are already on

the path to positivity!

Here’s a countdown of the

Top 10 Ways to Accentuate the Positive in the Workplace:

10. Stay Present – This means Stay in the Moment, perhaps by making time to Plan Your Day, breaking down your workload into more manageable bits, or taking things one task at a time. Indeed, remaining present will help you be less anxious, and more focused on the big picture, and what’s truly important.

9. Breathe – Deeply. Yes. It really IS that simple. Whether at a meditation class during lunchtime (ask Debra about this one!), or simply taking a moment at your desk–eyes opened or closed–to breathe in & out, slowly, staying aware of your breath, DOES help!

8. Be Well – Eat Well. Sleep Well. Exercise. Making your health a priority will allow you to Stay Well, Stay Present, and Not Sweat the Small Stuff (as much!)

7. Decorate to Accentuate – In ways that you can, add some personal flair, pizzazz, or comforts of home to your workplace. Favorite colors, pictures of family & friends, artwork, even flowers can do wonders to lift your spirits at work!

 

6. Get Up, Get Out, & MOVE! – Getting up and away from your desk, stretching, walking around the block, getting some sun (Vitamin D if you please!), and just switching it up will help you de-stress, and re-focus!

5. Avoid Office Gossip – This includes “Office Politics”, and negative “Water Cooler Chatter”. Being and/or convening with a Negative Nancy is Bad News Bears.   Period.

4. List Your Job Benefits – Now, this doesn’t just mean your pension plan, although that certainly is a positive! Be it health care, steady income, learning new skills, interacting with others, opportunities to network, or increased independence, listing the benefits of your job helps keep even a seemingly unbearable work situation in perspective.

3. Proclaim the Positive! – Even in the most dreary of job situations, it helps to take note of the aspects of your job that actually give you joy, and a sense of accomplishment. This may include being able to provide for yourself and/or your family, being able to help others, or even just knowing that you are good at what you do!

2. Stop & Smell the Roses – Seriously. Whether you take this literally, and take pause as you walk to smell a sweet rose bud, or more symbolically as you share a laugh with a co-worker, this holistic approach will improve your mood, and warm your heart.

1. Work with Purpose! – Find meaning in what you do everyday, even if it is job searching. Embrace an Attitude of Gratitude! Give yourself a pat on the back for sticking through the difficult times, being able to make a difference in people’s lives, and learning to appreciate were you are right now.

As Marie Stempinski, President and Founder of Strategic Communication, says:

“Life doesn’t just happen. You are in charge and can control how you react to everything that happens to and around you.”

And, when all else seems to fail, breathe again.

Things ARE getting better!