Tag Archive | Temp Agency

Success Indicator

The Success IndicatorHere, at the end of the year, Monroe Personnel Service, LLC & Temptime is evaluating what has gone well, what hasn’t gone well, and we want to “kick up the success meter a bit”.  Here’s a visual guide created by MaryEllen Tribby, founder and CEO of WorkingMomsOnly.com She also shares an inspiring story…

“A few months ago I spoke at an event that Steve Wozniak also spoke at. As you can imagine, when it was time for Steve’s session, it was jam-packed. Packed with attendees, vendors and all the other speakers.about her dinner with another successful entrepreneur, Steve Wozniak….

As I sat there and listened to Steve poignantly share the story of Apple and his relationship with Steve Jobs, I was enthralled. He started from their middle school years and went right up until the present, after Steve Jobs’ passing.

It seemed like he did not leave out a single detail. He just talked. There was no power point presentation, there were not even note cards — he just told his story from his heart.

What struck me the most was not Steve Wozniak’s extreme brilliance or his exuberant passion.

No, what struck me the most was his overwhelming sense of gratitude. His gratitude for having the opportunity to make the world a better place. To help us all to be able to communicate with loved ones, to run our businesses better and to have an enhanced life.

That evening I had the opportunity to sit with Steve at dinner. This was one of the smartest individuals I have ever met, and he was literally thanking all of us at the dinner table for allowing him to create some of the best technology in the world.

This experience prompted me to go back and examine a chart I created a year ago about the characteristic traits of successful people vs. those of unsuccessful people.

I have enhanced that chart and added traits that I believe to be some of the most important because nothing in life is satanic.

This chart was inspired and composed after meeting and working with some of the smartest, most successful entrepreneurs in the world, many of who are dear friends.
The following is that chart I compiled of characteristics, traits and behaviors of successful people vs. unsuccessful people.

Drum roll please . . .

The Success Factor Indicator

Successful People
Have a sense of gratitude
Forgive others
Accept responsibility for their failures
Compliment
Read everyday
Keep a journal
Talk about ideas
Want others to succeed
Share information and data
Keep a “to-be” list
Exude joy
Keep a “to-do/project” list
Set goals and develop life plans
Embrace change
Give other people credit for their victories
Operate from a transformational perspective

Unsuccessful People
Have a sense of entitlement
Hold a grudge
Blame others for their failures
Criticize
Watch TV everyday
Say they keep a journal but really don’t
Talk about people
Secretly hope others fail
Horde information and data
Don’t know what they want to be
Exude anger
Fly by their seat of their pants
Never set goals
Think they know it all
Fear change
Take all the credit of their victories
Operate from a transactional perspective

If you are ready kick up the success meter a bit, make a conscious effort to eliminate the traits on the right hand side of the chart above.

Hey, none of us is perfect but as long as we recognize and identify where we need to improve and continually strive to get there — greater success will follow.”

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Young Professionals: Six Keys to Building Your Career

by Josh Bersin

This week two new studies (one by The Economist and one by Quantum Workplace) highlight how rapidly young professionals’ view of their careers have changed. While startups continue to be exciting and people desperately want to work for pre-IPO companies, research shows that most Millennials (under the age of 30) are starting to really mature in their career thinking.

Here is some data:

Young People are Getting more Serious: The days of young people smoking marijuana, hanging around on the street in cities like Berlin, or kids in the UK engaging in binge drinking are slowly coming to an end. The Economist research shows that these teams of youth are going away and people are focused on their education, career, and making a living.

“Across the OECD, a club of 34 mostly rich countries, enrollment of 15- to 19-year-olds in education increased by 11 percentage points to 83% between 1995 and 2011. Among adults in their 20s participation in higher education has increased by a third. Young people who are studying rather than in paid employment have less money for hedonism.” (The Economist article).

People in their 20s rate “professional development” as their #1 issue in selecting a great place to work. The Quantum study, which surveyed 400,000 professionals, rated the top drivers of engagement by age and look what they found (it’s not surprising).

Fig 1: Quantum Workplace 2014 Employee Engagement Trends Report

Fig 2: Engagement vs. Education, from Quantum Workplace Engagement Report

Young professionals: this is your time. What this data, coupled with the strong jobs report launched earlier this week, shows is that we have entered a period of time where younger workers (people in their 20s and early 30s) are now getting far more serious about their careers.

Young Professionals: Welcome to Your Career – Six Keys

As an aging baby boomer who spends my career looking at talent and business trends, let me summarize some suggestions:

1. It’s time to take your career seriously: make sure you achieve your goals, openly communicate with your manager, and express your ambitions clearly.

When I was young I was far too shy (and not even sure) about my personal career .. and not until my late 20s did I really have any idea where it was going. Don’t worry if your current job doesn’t seem like your “dream job” – learn everything you can, contribute positively, develop great relationships, and express your desires in an open way. Today more than ever employers will help find you the right next step, as long as you’re doing good work in your current role.

2. Seek out the mentoring and advice of others.

Now that you’ve become a little more serious about your career, take some time to have lunch with a more senior friend, work associate, or even family friend. Ask them about their career, what they learned, and how they decided to do what they do. Building a career will take decades, and you will get lots of good ideas on which direction to go from many of us who have been down this path.

3. Stay open to changes and diversions in your path.

The one thing I would say about my career (and I hear this from most senior people) is that I could never have predicted it would go where it went. Every job and every assignment will teach you something new: something about work, something about life, and something about yourself. Stay open to these new assignments and opportunities and look at them as your stair-step path toward your eventual “perfect job,” whatever that may be.

4. Teach yourself every day.

These days we have so much learning, content, and information available online you should spend your commute time, travel time, or down time learning something new. Read about a new company or technology; follow a business leader you admire; take courses in new technology or tools; and learn to use all the tools around us. The world of business changes faster than ever – you should get comfortable being a “continuous and relentless learner.”

5. Push your limits.

The most valuable learning experiences you will have in your career happen when you get thrown into the deep end of the pool and think you can’t swim. I had a whole series of jobs I was not qualified for, but after months of hard work and lots of late nights, I figured most of them out and each one became transformational in my own career growth. If your boss offers a new assignment which is both important and new, think hard about taking it!

6. Be yourself.

Last year I wrote an article called “Learning to Be Yourself.” Now, more than ever, as the job market heats up, you should spend some time learning what you are really all about. I was always an introvert and shy as a young professional, and sure enough that eventually brought me into a career as an analyst, researcher, and entrepreneur. Don’t try to copy someone else who appears to be getting ahead – your path will be much more valuable if you stay true to yourself.

“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
― Oscar Wilde

“Always be a first rate version of yourself and not a second rate version of someone else.”
― Judy Garland

Building a career is a never-ending process, and even if you get layed off or your boss fires you, it’s part of moving forward. A good friend of mine is a senior HR executive and she was just ousted from the company she worked at for many years. Rather than think of this as a “failure” or “mistake,” I encouraged her to think about it as the opening of a new door to her career – one as an HR leader at a new, perhaps smaller company who will value her skills even more.

Every career is unique and you can succeed in a myriad of ways. I admire my doctor for the career he built; our family nutritionist is a highly successful professional in her chosen field; whenever I hire a contractor or consultant I learn about their career and am usually fascinated by their experiences.

The research clearly shows that over the next 3-5 years career development will be one of the most important issues in the labor market. Employers: take heed – if you don’t offer these kinds of “tours of duty” (as Reid Hoffman calls it in The Alliance), you’ll lose good people.

And those of you in the first ten years of your own journey, strap yourself in for an adventure and enjoy the ride. If you follow some of my advice, every day will be a growth experience and you’ll look back 30 years from now and say “wow, what a great career I had.”

Dress for Success

p1When Job-Hunting: Dress for Success

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

It’s probably one of the most overused phrases in job-hunting, but also one of the most underutilized by job-seekers: dress for success. In job-hunting, first impressions are critical. Remember, you are marketing a product — yourself — to a potential employer, and the first thing the employer sees when greeting you is your attire; thus, you must make every effort to have the proper dress for the type of job you are seeking. Will dressing properly get you the job? Of course not, but it will give you a competitive edge and a positive first impression.

Should you be judged by what you wear? Perhaps not, but the reality is, of course, that you are judged. Throughout the entire job-seeking process employers use short-cuts — heuristics or rules of thumb — to save time. With cover letters, it’s the opening paragraph and a quick scan of your qualifications. With resumes, it is a quick scan of your accomplishments. With the job interview, it’s how you’re dressed that sets the tone of the interview.

How should you dress? Dressing conservatively is always the safest route, but you should also try and do a little investigating of your prospective employer so that what you wear to the interview makes you look as though you fit in with the organization. If you overdress (which is rare but can happen) or underdress (the more likely scenario), the potential employer may feel that you don’t care enough about the job.

How do you find out what is the proper dress for a given job/company/industry? You can call the Human Resources office where you are interviewing and simply ask. Or, you could visit the company’s office to retrieve an application or other company information and observe the attire current employees are wearing — though make sure you are not there on a “casual day” and misinterpret the dress code.

Finally, do you need to run out and spend a lot of money on clothes for interviewing? No, but you should make sure you have at least two professional sets of attire. You’ll need more than that, but depending on your current financial condition, two is enough to get started and you can buy more once you have the job or have more financial resources.

Expert Hints for Dress for Success for Men and Women

Attention to details is crucial, so here are some tips for both men and women. Make sure you have:

  • clean and polished conservative dress shoes
  • well-groomed hairstyle
  • cleaned and trimmed fingernails
  • minimal cologne or perfume
  • no visible body piercing beyond conservative ear piercings for women
  • well-brushed teeth and fresh breath
  • no gum, candy, or other objects in your mouth
  • minimal jewelry
  • no body odor

Finally, check your attire in the rest room just before your interview for a final check of your appearance — to make sure your tie is straight, your hair is combed, etc.

 

The Pros of Hiring Temporary Employees

bigstock_Happy_Business_People_2706069

By Kayla Bayens

Hiring temps is becoming the normal in today’s businesses. Many companies hire only temps, later bringing on the really great workers as full time employees. This practice is seen a lot and there is a reason for it. The practice of hiring temporary employees affords the companies a lot of benefits that they normally wouldn’t get. Below are some reasons that your company should start thinking about hiring temporary employees when it comes to filling your staffing needs.

Built in Screening

Hiring a temporary employee through an agency all the screening is handled for you. When you are sent a potential candidate you know that person has been screened for qualifications, had a background check, and is legally allowed to work in the state. All that work is handled for you without having to bog down your HR people. The weeding is done before the resumes even reach your hand.

Staffing Flexibilityhappy-worker

You can quickly adjust to any changes in your workload in order to maximize your efficiency. Suddenly have a large influx of work coming in, hire a few temporary employees through a Temp Agency in order to help handle it. Has your workload dipped down after a few months? Well luckily for you instead of having to now keep on unneeded employees while hoping for another large workload to come in you can just let the Temp Agency know the assignment is completed. Both you and the temporary employee can move on to other things while still having both your needs met.

Evaluate without Commitment

Alot of company’s work off of a temp to hire system because of this benefit. Sure someone’s resume might look amazing, and they might have been fantastic in the interviews. But how are they really when it comes to jumping into the job and working? Why not be able to take a few months and find that out without the headache of hiring them on full time when it might not even end up being a good fit. Sure most places have a probationary period for new hires but if that cut off date sneaks up on you without you realizing then you’re in trouble.

Save Time & Money

In most cases hiring a temporary employee is cheaper then hiring a full time employee with benefits. That is because when you go through a Temp Agency they, the agency, not you are the ones who take on the financial burden and responsibilities for recruiting, screening, testing and hiring workers; payroll expenses and paperwork; payroll and withholding taxes; unemployment and workers’ compensation insurance and any other employee benefits they may want to provide. Taking the brunt of the work, time, and money it takes to find the right employee off your hands. Allowing you to focus more on building the best company possible.

happy-workersSpecialized Skills

Sometimes you just don’t have a particular skill that you need in order for your team to accomplish a project. Temporary employees allow you to quickly find and hire on someone with that specialized skill set. Often these individuals also take less time to ramp up into full gear. Which lets your team quickly move forward rather then waiting for the sometimes tedious task of hiring a permanent employee.

High Productivity

You might think temporary employees might be a bit lacking in productivity since they know they won’t be there long. However the opposite as in fact found to be true. According to an extensive study conducted by Vox on labor markets from 1985-2008 it was found when markets were deregulated to allow for more temporary workers employment and GDP per employed person both greatly increased. So contrary to popular belief temporary workers are actually on a whole extremely productive and beneficial to a company.

Stress Free

Monroe Personnel Service, LLC & Temptime has been feeling the stress of the dynamic times we all live in here in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Steve Tobak says “… it’s a crazy, complex world out there…”.  In the following article he published in Inc.com  Steve shares pointers how he leads himself and his organization out of the downward spiral that stress can easily pull us into.

7 Ways to Be a Stress-Free Workaholic

The complexity, competitiveness, rate of change, and communication overload of modern business life mean one thing: If you want to win, you’ve got to learn to manage stress.

Saying it’s a crazy, complex world out there is putting it mildly. The rate of technological change is staggering. The constant bombardment of information and communication has us all on overload. And we’re constantly slugging it out in a brutally competitive global market.

If it seems as if you’re locked in a downward spiral of trying to do more with less, it isn’t you. It’s for real. That surprising array of macro factors creates stress on all of our businesses and on all of us. We try to manage it as best we can, but at some point, things break. Systems break. People break. That’s the nature of stress.

If you’re an entrepreneur, you’re well aware of the constant pressure to keep your burn rate down and stretch capital investments as far as they’ll go. And should the stars align and you gain customer traction, then you’ve got the not-insignificant challenges of high growth and scalability to deal with.

Either way, there are times when you feel the weight of the world on your shoulders. And that means stress, big time. Having lived through several high-growth companies, a few successful and failed start-ups, and 20 years of executive management, I have plenty of great strategies for managing stress.

Work your tail off when you have to, not when you don’t. Business happens in spurts. Always. Whether you’re developing a product or growing a business, those long hours don’t go on forever. It’s OK to kill yourself for a few weeks or months, as long as you chill out for a while when it’s over. If you do it constantly, you’re asking for trouble.

Learn to give up–sort of. When you’re overstressed, overworked, and the ideas just won’t come, try giving up. Seriously, just call it quits, go home, go for a run, whatever. Once you relax, that’s when inspiration flows–usually when you’re lying in bed half asleep or in the shower.

Strategize and plan. Here’s a method for managing stress you’re not likely to see anywhere else. When things seem overwhelming, they’re often the result of day-to-day inertia. To thwart the evils of the status quo, take a step back and gain some perspective. Get some time away from distractions–just you or with your team–and brainstorm, strategize, and plan. Have a nice dinner out. You’ll be amazed at the results.

Mix business with pleasure. Whenever you’re going through high-stress times, take your team out for dinner. Have a few drinks. Take breaks and goof around. Yes, it probably takes longer to get things done that way, but I would argue that higher morale increases effectiveness.

Don’t leave things for the last minute. Yes, I know you can’t always control this, but if you can–and you can more often than you think–give yourself a buffer. You’d be amazed how much more relaxed you’ll be if you plan to finish your pitch a day early or get to the airport a couple of hours before the flight.

Don’t take it out on others. Leaders and managers, listen up. Maybe you can function at a high level, but if you’re simultaneously demotivating your team, then what’s the point? And if you take it out on family and friends, you’re just going to end up lonely and depressed. If you can’t handle the stress, find an outlet that doesn’t include taking it out on other living things.

Lots of outlets work–pick one or two. Caffeine can boost your mood and performance during the day. Wine can bring you down and help you sleep at night. But you can’t keep that sort of cycle up for too long. Learn to exercise, meditate, get outdoors, build things, play Scrabble, talk to someone–whatever works, do it.

Look, if you want to be a workaholic, that’s fine, be my guest. But at least learn how to be a high-functioning one, meaning don’t just run yourself and your team into the ground. If you’re practical, you’ll be effective.

Above all, learn to recognize the signs of burnout in yourself and your people. Downward spirals are hard to break out of. And, if you’re a leader, you’ll take everyone, and maybe the entire company, down with you.

Galvanize Your Actions for the New Year

Monroe Personnel Service, LLC & Temptime loves to use quotes to inspire and motivate.  We like this set of new year quotes and perhaps they will inspire you too.  Geoffrey James brings us these quotes from Sales Source column on Inc.com Writing Pen

This set of inspirational thoughts for the new year will galvanize you into action.

At the start of every year, I create a list of quotes to guide and inspire me for the next 12 months. Here are the quotes I’ve selected for 2013:

“Cherish your visions and your dreams as they are the children of your soul, the blueprints of your ultimate achievements.”
Napoleon Hill

“The key to success is to focus our conscious mind on things we desire not things we fear.”
Brian Tracy

“Success is getting what you want. Happiness is wanting what you get.”
Dale Carnegie

“Obstacles are necessary for success because in selling, as in all careers of importance, victory comes only after many struggles and countless defeats.”
Og Mandino

“A real decision is measured by the fact that you’ve taken a new action. If there’s no action, you haven’t truly decided.”
Tony Robbins

“If you can’t control your anger, you are as helpless as a city without walls waiting to be attacked.”
The Book of Proverbs

A mediocre person tells. A good person explains. A superior person demonstrates. A great person inspires others to see for themselves.”
Harvey Mackay

“Freedom, privileges, options, must constantly be exercised, even at the risk of inconvenience.”
Jack Vance

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.”  Jim Rohn

“You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want.”
Zig Ziglar

“The number of times I succeed is in direct proportion to the number of times I can fail and keep on trying.”
Tom Hopkins

“You have everything you need to build something far bigger than yourself.”
Seth Godin

Be Successful Now & Everyday

The Success Indicator by MaryEllen Tribby

The Success Indicator by MaryEllen Tribby

Here, at the end of the year, Monroe Personnel Service, LLC & Temptime is evaluating what has gone well, what hasn’t gone well, and we want to “kick up the success meter a bit”.  Here’s a visual guide created by MaryEllen Tribby, founder and CEO of WorkingMomsOnly.com She also shares an inspiring story…

“A few months ago I spoke at an event that Steve Wozniak also spoke at. As you can imagine, when it was time for Steve’s session, it was jam-packed. Packed with attendees, vendors and all the other speakers.about her dinner with another successful entrepreneur, Steve Wozniak….

As I sat there and listened to Steve poignantly share the story of Apple and his relationship with Steve Jobs, I was enthralled. He started from their middle school years and went right up until the present, after Steve Jobs’ passing.

It seemed like he did not leave out a single detail. He just talked. There was no power point presentation, there were not even note cards — he just told his story from his heart.

What struck me the most was not Steve Wozniak’s extreme brilliance or his exuberant passion.

No, what struck me the most was his overwhelming sense of gratitude. His gratitude for having the opportunity to make the world a better place. To help us all to be able to communicate with loved ones, to run our businesses better and to have an enhanced life.

That evening I had the opportunity to sit with Steve at dinner. This was one of the smartest individuals I have ever met, and he was literally thanking all of us at the dinner table for allowing him to create some of the best technology in the world.

This experience prompted me to go back and examine a chart I created a year ago about the characteristic traits of successful people vs. those of unsuccessful people.

I have enhanced that chart and added traits that I believe to be some of the most important because nothing in life is satanic.

This chart was inspired and composed after meeting and working with some of the smartest, most successful entrepreneurs in the world, many of who are dear friends.
The following is that chart I compiled of characteristics, traits and behaviors of successful people vs. unsuccessful people.

Drum roll please . . .

The Success Factor Indicator

Successful People
Have a sense of gratitude
Forgive others
Accept responsibility for their failures
Compliment
Read everyday
Keep a journal
Talk about ideas
Want others to succeed
Share information and data
Keep a “to-be” list
Exude joy
Keep a “to-do/project” list
Set goals and develop life plans
Embrace change
Give other people credit for their victories
Operate from a transformational perspective

Unsuccessful People
Have a sense of entitlement
Hold a grudge
Blame others for their failures
Criticize
Watch TV everyday
Say they keep a journal but really don’t
Talk about people
Secretly hope others fail
Horde information and data
Don’t know what they want to be
Exude anger
Fly by their seat of their pants
Never set goals
Think they know it all
Fear change
Take all the credit of their victories
Operate from a transactional perspective

If you are ready kick up the success meter a bit, make a conscious effort to eliminate the traits on the right hand side of the chart above.

Hey, none of us is perfect but as long as we recognize and identify where we need to improve and continually strive to get there — greater success will follow.”