Tag Archive | Generosity

9 WAYS TO BE MORE GENEROUS AT WORK AND GET FURTHER IN YOUR CAREER

Generosity is often an overlooked characteristic in a list of desirable traits for the workplace. Most people consider hard work, strong leadership, and team cohesion as more important when determining an employee or employer. But it all comes back to generosity and a workplace won’t function without it. In any job that involves working with others (essentially all of them), there is a level of give-and-take, making generosity absolutely essential.

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Picture thanks to wisebread.com

In order to be a stand-out team member and get further in your career, consider generosity. Are you generous in the workplace? What does workplace generosity even look like? Here are nine steps to becoming more generous at work. We suggest implementing them and then watching your career take off.

  1.   Make your boss’s life easier.

Your boss is most likely not only supervising you but a slew of other employees as well. Improve your generosity by trying to make their work life easier. You can achieve this by completing tasks ahead of schedule and picking up the slack before even being asked.

  1.   Plan ahead.

Most offices are a tightly run ship; there just isn’t enough room in the deadlines to fall behind. Be generous with your fellow co-workers by planning ahead and staying on top of your specific tasks. If you’ve accomplished your to-dos ahead of time, ask if anyone needs help completing theirs.

  1.   Give credit.

One of the easiest ways to increase workplace generosity is to give credit where credit is due. If you are praised for a completed  team project, make sure others receive recognition as well.

  1.   Assume responsibility.

On the flip side, if your team dropped the ball or made a mistake, be sure to assume collective responsibility for it. Don’t let the rest of your team take the fall for something you all had a part to play in.

  1.   Provide guidance.

If you are in a position of seniority with employees beneath you, be generous with them by providing guidance. Always ask if you can help them with something or if they have questions.

  1.   Be a mentor.

Mentorship is key to successful businesses. You should always be looking to both give and receive mentorship. Help cultivate a generous place of learning by making yourself available to mentor another.

  1.   Share information.

Some employees view the knowledge they possess as their key to job security. But in order to be truly generous and effective in the workplace, you must share that expertise with others to create cohesion in your office.

  1.   Be happy.

The workplace is often stressful and chaotic, but when you keep a positive attitude, you build an environment of calm and peace that helps improve workflow.

  1.   Be kind.

The golden rule of treating others as you would like to be treated applies in the workplace as well. By building each other up, you become a more effective team that gets noticed for its great work. Each person should feel valued and you can help cement that through kindness.

Being generous at work is important. It helps get things done as a team and catapults your own career toward success. In order to collaborate with others, every person should strive to improve their own generosity. We hope these tips help!

Source: written by Ariix editor Ariix

Four ways your generosity might improve your workplace 

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 picture thanks to emotivebrand.com

Hiking pay to motivate skilled employees is just so last century.  In 2018 more nuance is needed to incentivise high performance in a sophisticated team.   Leaders need to develop a more advanced approach to generosity:

 

  1.   Time – be generous with your time. Many leaders are time-poor so how they choose to use the potential ‘people’ time they do have available will be important.  And it will be noticed by the people they lead. In those precious free moments, do you take the opportunity to really talk to someone on your team about how things are going? Or do you put your head down, take out your phone and catch up on those emails…?

 

  1.   Experience – be generous with your experience:  share what you know; what you’ve learnt; and, crucially, the mistakes you’ve made.  Great leaders need to communicate their knowledge and experience – including the stuff that shows they are less than perfect.  Particularly in highly competitive workplaces, where there’s pressure to succeed, it helps others to know you are human and fallible.  If you’ve never shared one of your mistakes with your team, you might be surprised how significant it can be in building trust and making you more approachable.

 

  1.   Opportunity – be generous with the best work.  You might be more experienced, and you might believe (know?) you’d do it better, but if you keep the key clients and files, work, etc. for yourself…how will anyone else ever be able to get there? Take a look at the current work distribution in your team. Could you be generous and give someone else the next thing you really wanted to do yourself (or even the thing you believe only you can can do)?  And then support them to truly excel at it. Do you trust them?  

 

  1.   Interpretation – be generous with the benefit of the doubt (to a point).   When someone does something or says something that’s “not okay”, begin with the best interpretation the situation reasonably allows.  Try to start from the assumption that no harm was intended. Assume mistake rather than negligence. Assume error rather than evil. Take it from there.  Most of the time, most people don’t intend to get things wrong or cause upset. If you at least start with assuming benign intent – you’ll be better able to see the situation from their point of view – and have a better conversation about the impact it had. That’s not to say problematic behaviour should go unaddressed.  It’s just that a generous starting-point leads to a better conversation – less defensiveness, more honesty and willingness to hear a difficult message.  

 

If all else fails – there’s still the cash option as an outlet for your generosity.  The odd generously stacked plate of chocolate chip cookies can’t hurt either.

Source: written by Alison Best for Byrnedean

What is Giving at Work

Giving at work refers to the charitable contributions of money [payroll deduction, employer matching funds and workplace fundraising activities], personal time and personal skills [volunteering] and in-kind support by employees and their employers. Many employers choose to enhance their giving at work initiatives with broader business-related community activities such as formal sponsorship engagements and cause–related marketing.

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Picture thanks to PsychologyToday.com

For employers, offering giving at work campaigns connects them with the communities where their employees and customers live, and demonstrates their commitment to values apart from “the bottom line.” Many times giving at work campaigns can be linked to overall business strategy and positioned as part of the business’s overall community engagement programs.

For employees, giving at work is easy, especially when spread out through a number of pay periods. Donors give with confidence because participating charities have been reviewed and qualified.

For charities, the giving at work campaign can function as a teaching place for generosity in giving. Encouraging young employees to make their first contributions may lead to future generosity. Giving at work campaigns also offer additional chances to communicate and present mission, capabilities and results.

 

Giving at work:

  • Encourages employee and community engagement with business organizations
  • Increases donated resources into the community through a cost-effective and impactful process
  • Generates additional unrestricted general operating funds for participating nonprofit organizations
  • Results in many cases with larger contributions per individual than might be given in “one shot.” $10 per pay period could total $260, an amount higher than most contributions resulting from other fundraising methods
  • Raises support at a lower cost than would be possible if every charity had to contact each worker individually by mail or phone

 

Source: written by Caring Connection

5 Ways to Be More Generous At Work (Without Spending A Dime)

Being generous doesn’t just make you a better person, it makes you feel better and often makes people like you more. Whether you’re looking to be generous for generosity’s sake or hoping that being generous will improve your life, there are a wide variety of ways you can do it. If you’re looking to infuse a little more generosity into your life, why not start by doing it at work? Here are 5 ways you can be more generous at work without spending a dime.

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Picture thanks to Lopscoop.com

 

1. Thank You/Thinking Of You Notes: The simple act of writing a thank you or thinking of you note to coworkers, clients, or people within your professional network is a small act of generosity that can go a long way towards fostering long lasting career connections. These notes take little time to write and are vastly appreciated by almost everyone who receives them.

2. Lend A Hand on A Stressful Project: We’ve all worked on projects that have gotten to a point that makes us want to tear our hair out. If you want to be generous, try lending a hand to one of your coworkers when they’re dealing with a stressful project.

3. Share Your Skills: If one of your coworkers is struggling with something you’re great at, offer to share your skills and teach them a batter way to do it. Being generous with the knowledge you already has will make your coworkers more knowledgeable and that results in your whole team being easier to work with. Plus, they may be more willing to share a skill that you haven’t quite grasped with you down the line.

4. Open Lines of Communication: If you’ve had some success in your career there are probably plenty of people in your company or students who are hoping to some day be where you are who would love to speak with you. Being generous with your contact information can help these people reach out to you for advice, tips, or just a connection that may some day help them get to where they want to be.

5. Favors Without Expectation of Return: Although generosity can make you a more likable, pleasant person in many people’s eyes, it’s important to remember that doing so without expectation of return is one of the most truly generous things you can do. When people ask for favors do them but don’t say “You owe me one”. When someone asks for help don’t expect them to help you later on. Performing favors without expectation of return when you can builds up great career karma for you but it also shows you the true meaning of generosity.

You don’t have to spend money to be a more generous person and, if you’re looking to infuse a little more generosity in your day-to-day work life, these 5 options are all great. Try out one or all five of them this week and see how much better you feel!

 

Source: written by Chelsea Babin for Camden Kelly