Archive | May 2017

10 Productive Things to Do on a Slow Day at Work

It’s the slow season at work, and if you waste one more day playing “wastebasket ball”, you’re going to go crazy. But all your work for the day is done, and aside from counting down the minutes until lunch break, you’re out of ideas for things to do. Take control of your extra time and try these 10 ideas for productive things to do to fill your slow days at work.

 

  1. EVALUATE GOALS AND INTENTIONS 

Both professional and personal intentions for the upcoming months or year are crucial for growth and prosperity. Make your intentions visible for you to see every day and share them with freely with others — so take time to evaluate your current goals and intentions, and consider setting some new ones.

  1. IMPROVE A PROCESS

“Noises” always come up when you’re running a process; especially a process is dynamic and changing all the time. To better your work and enhance your productivity, use the slow times to evaluate a particular process you use rather frequently and create more efficient ways to work.

  1. MAKE A TO-DO LIST

It’s hard to be productive when you’re low on mental energy. Try to manage your time wisely and organize your specific activities prior to the start of the day. The best way is to make a TO-DO LIST, which helps you to choose and complete tasks with better focus, and to reflect on your overall role and whether you’re achieving your larger objectives.

  1. TIDY DESK, TIDY MIND

On a normal day, it can be hard to find the time to organize your files properly. On slow days, clean off your desk, label your folders, clean up your inbox and archive your emails, and otherwise straighten out your notes and files. That way, you’ll be more prepared when you get busy again.

  1. GET AHEAD

Your work for the day may be done, but what about tomorrow’s work? Or next week’s work? If there’s anything you can do to get ahead, DO IT. Your workday may be slow today, but you never know when a crisis will hit and interfere with your regular workload.

  1. FIND A NEW PROJECT

It never hurts to ask your supervisors for an extra project if you’ve run out of things to do. They will be impressed by your initiative, plus you won’t be bored anymore. Make sure this is just a side project without a strict deadline though, in case you do get busy.

  1. HELP YOUR COLLEAGUES

Take a walk around the office and check in with your colleagues. If anyone looks overwhelmed, offer to help them out with something. Not only will you be building a rapport with your co-workers, but you’ll be able to call in a favor in the future if you ever need some help yourself.

  1. NETWORK WITH OTHERS

When you’re busy, your calls to clients are likely short and straight to the point. Take advantage of your free time and make a few courtesy calls to your customers, just to chat and check in; or write a thank you card. Building good relationships with your clients will help you to become more well-known in your industry.

  1. READ ARTICLES

Stay informed about your industry by subscribing to newsletters and reading the latest news in your field. Staying knowledgeable will give you an edge over your colleagues. If your industry is slow, read articles about current events instead to keep yourself up-to-date on world news.

  1. EXERCISE DAILY

It’s time to take action when you’re feeling bored. Exercising before work will give you an extra energy boost to carry you through the day. When you’re in the office, you can lift 5 pounds weights, or do some yoga and stretching poses designed to be done anytime and anywhere. Taking a quick break and walking around the block also refreshes and reenergizes.

Advertisements

The End of the Office Dress Code

Below are excerpts from an article first published on May 25, 2016 in the New York Times.
working girl
Melanie Griffith, Harrison Ford and Sigourney Weaver in a publicity still for the film “Working Girl.”CreditHerbert Dorfman/Corbis, via Getty Images via the New York Times
We live in a moment in which the notion of a uniform is increasingly out of fashion, at least when it comes to the implicit codes of professional and public life. If once upon a time Melanie Griffith’s character in “Working Girl” could manipulate viewers’ assumptions about her job and background simply by swapping leather jackets and minidresses for greige suits, today it would be impossible. “We are in a very murky period,” Ms. McClendon, assistant curator of costume at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, said.
The slippery slope may have started as a gentle incline way back in the 1970’s, and become a bit steeper during the Casual Friday movement of the 1990’s and the success of the Facebook I.P.O. in 2012 with its hoodie-wearing billionaires. But today, we are speeding down it at breakneck pace, partly thanks to the hot-button conversation around gender equality, and fluidity.
“There has been a dramatic change very recently,” said Susan Scafidi, a law professor at Fordham University and founder of the Fashion Law Institute. She noted that last December the New York City Commission on Human Rights announced new guidelines for the municipal human rights law that expressly prohibited “enforcing dress codes, uniforms, and grooming standards that impose different requirements based on sex or gender.”
As a result, no employer may require men to wear ties unless they also require women to wear ties, or ask that heels be worn unless both sexes have to wear them. And though this applies only to “official” dress codes, the trickle-down effect is inevitable.
“Dress is now open to the interpretation of the individual, rather than an institution,” Professor Scafidi said.
This has created an even greater tension in the more ambiguous areas of office dress, especially as the boundaries between home and work become ever blurrier. And that has led to all sorts of complications. One person’s “appropriate” can easily be another’s “disgraceful,” and words like “professional,” when used to describe dress requirements, can seem so vague as to be almost meaningless. Kanye West wearing ripped jeans and a jeweled Balmain jacket at the Met Gala: cool or rude? Julia Roberts at the premiere of “Money Monster” at Cannes this year in bare feet: red carpet pioneer or a step too far?
These issues are only going to get more complicated. “We are moving into an era where personal expression is going to trump the desire to create a corporate identity,” Professor Scafidi said. “It’s a huge power shift.” And it has already begun.
**** Editor’s Note:  This article was written two years ago.  It seems particularly timely given that our current President has been reported to want women who work in the White house to “dress like women.” ****